Tag Archives: elections

Let’s Talk About the Money

2 Jul

The Representation of The Peoples Act, 1976 (and not a recent Supreme Court ruling) mandates that candidates must not spend more than Rs1.5 million on their electoral campaigns for the National Assembly. All National Assembly candidates are required to maintain a separate bank account for electoral finances and submit receipts to their returning officer for expenses incurred in the campaigning process to ensure that they do not exceed the amount specified. But this number is an inconsequential joke for Pakistani politicians and is unknown to most Pakistanis who, under the same act, have the power to scrutinise any candidate’s electoral expenses. In April 2012, the Supreme Court in its ruling on the Constitutional Petition No 87 of 2011, upheld these rules and directed the Election Commission to monitor candidates’ election expenses.

The rules of electoral finance lie at the very heart of the democratic process. These regulations are put in place to ensure that elections, by virtue of their cost, do not become the exclusive domain of the filthy rich. Our criminal neglect of electoral finance is one of the reasons for the kind of democracy we live in. Requiring the Election Commission to implement this Supreme Court verdict will require capacity that the Election Commission does not possess. But this is where friends of democracy should be directing their energies if we really want to change the quality and calibre of those in power.

The lacklustre leadership in control of the country consists of those people who have the money and clout to contest and win elections, which in Pakistan are neither won nor contested on the basis of competence or the policy views held by the candidates. Instead, contested on the basis of power and money, those that have neither, stand spectacularly slim chances of ever winning an election. So, we can automatically write-off most of the upstanding members of society. Therefore, until we change (or implement) the rules of financing the electoral game, we are likely to end up with the corrupt but powerful in the national driving seat.

What could be sadder than a country that has to resort to thinking of who is the least corrupt, least dishonest or least incompetent when trying to decide who should hold one of the highest offices in the land? Continue reading

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PTI: Not the Change I seek

22 May

Immi Our Savior

Crushed by inflation, tired of terrorism, sick of corruption and on the verge of a revolution seeking an end to growing inequality, we are a nation that not only seeks but needs change. I have been told that Imran Khan and his PTI are the change we seek. The millions that have thronged to his rallies are supposed to be proof that the people of Pakistan are ready to shun the old paradigm of politics and step into a more inclusive, democratic, less corrupt, less autocratic and more efficient era of politics and governance.

One change that Imran Khan brings is that he has motivated young people to participate in the political process. You now see the denim clad, ipod wielding scions of educated families shouting themselves hoarse at PTI rallies. Yesterday, Imran Khan announced a campaign to focus on recruiting young Pakistanis for PTI and introducing a transparent system of selecting party leadership. This is wonderful in theory – yet this announcement merely ads up to the elusive list of changes that PTI promises but fails to unveil much like its economic plan or counterterrorism strategy. 

Inclusion of disenchanted youth into politics is a positive change. But is it the change we need – especially if it is superficial? The question we should be asking ourselves is has PTI managed to change the political mindset of these new recruits or given them a platform for meaningful inclusion in shaping the party? Continue reading

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